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Sites in Reuse in Missouri

Ellisville Site

The Ellisville Site is located in Ellisville, Missouri and consists of three nearby non-contiguous subsites: the Bliss property, the Callahan property, and the Rosalie property. During the 1960s and 1970s, the Bliss Waste Oil Company operated in the transportation and disposal of waste oil products, industrial wastes and chemical wastes. These wastes were disposed of in pits and drums, and on the ground surface at the 11-acre Bliss property. The Callahan property is an 8-acre tract of land where drummed liquid and solid wastes were disposed of during the 1970s. The Rosalie property is a portion of an 85-acre tract of land where drummed liquid and solid wastes were disposed of in and near creeks. All three subsites drain to tributaries of the Missouri River. Area residents rely on drinking water drawn from private wells and the public distribution system. Site investigations discovered that soil at the Callahan and Rosalie properties was contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and soil at the Bliss property was contaminated with dioxin and VOCs. The potential for leachate grating into the ground water resulted in the addition of the site to the Superfund National Priorities List in 1983. The remedy for the Callahan and Rosalie properties was selected by EPA in 1985 and included excavation of contaminated soil and drums for offsite disposal, backfilling, capping, and reseeding to control erosion. During the investigation of the Bliss property contamination was discovered on four neighboring parcels: the Dubman and Weingart property, Primm property, Wade and Mercantile Trust Company property, and the Russell, Evelyn, and Jerry Bliss property. In 1986, EPA selected a remedy for these properties, including excavation and offsite disposal of dioxin-contaminated soils, buried drums and other contaminated materials. Cleanup was completed at the Bliss property in 1996 and Callahan and Rosalie properties in 1997. Ground water monitoring continues in accordance with the Record of Decision (ROD). Mid-America Arena developed a portion of the Bliss property to include a large indoor horse arena, stables, and an outdoor riding arena. Rapid residential development is taking place in the area and three occupied residences are located on the site.
Updated 1/2013

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Lake City Army Ammunition Plant (Northwest Lagoon)

The 3,935-acre Lake City Army Ammunition Plant (Northwest Lagoon) Superfund site is located in Independence, Missouri. Established in 1941, the site is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility used to manufacture and test ammunition for the U.S. Army. Activities at the site resulted in the contamination of ground water, soil and surface water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Cleanup activities at the site include treating ground water and sampling for chemical migration. Additional activities include placing soil cover on open waste lagoons, removing lead-contaminated sand piles, excavating soil and implementing land use restrictions. The base uses treated ground water as drinking water and process water for plant operations. The U.S. Army continues to use the site to manufacture, assemble, store and test ammunition.
Updated 10/2013

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Minker/Stout/Romaine Creek

The Minker/Stout/Romaine Creek Superfund site include about 10 acres of separate properties near the town of Imperial, Missouri. In the early 1970s, site operators sprayed dioxin-contaminated oil on the Bubbling Springs Ranch horse arena for dust control. This resulted in the illness and death of several horses. Dioxin-contaminated soil excavated from the horse arena ended up as fill material in residential areas. These areas included the Minker, Stout, Cashel and Sullins residences. Much of the fill from the Minker residence eroded into Romaine Creek. In 1983, EPA detected dioxin in the soil on site and in sediments of Romaine Creek as far as 6,000 feet downstream from the properties. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983 and permanently relocated 11 families affected by the contamination. Between 1985 and 1989, EPA excavated about 28,420 tons of soil at the Minker area, the Sullins and Cashel residences, Romaine Creek, and the Stout area. EPA sent this contaminated soil off site for incineration in 1996 and 1997. The state temporarily relocated two other families during excavation of the Minker area; they have since returned to their residences.
Updated 1/2013

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Oronogo-Duenweg Mining Belt
Site photo

Through the efforts of EPA, the State of Missouri and the local community, the Oronogo-Duenweg Mining Belt Superfund site in Joplin, Missouri, is the new home of a scrap metal recycling facility, a highway bypass, restored residential neighborhoods and over 1,600 acres of cleaned land now ready for redevelopment. The mining, milling and smelting of lead and zinc ores at the site began in the 1850s and continued in some areas until the 1970s. The smelting operations dispersed airborne contaminants, resulting in the contamination of the site’s ground water, surface water and soil with lead, zinc and cadmium. By 2000, EPA had conducted a time-critical removal action to address high blood lead levels in local children and had remediated 2,600 residential properties and agricultural lands in surrounding communities. Additionally, through a Prospective Purchaser Agreement with EPA, a scrap metal recycler bought and cleaned up 40 acres of the site prior to establishing its facility there. Following an agreement between EPA and the State of Missouri, the Missouri Highway and Transportation Department built the Route 249 highway bypass through four miles of contaminated land on the site, with mine wastes adaptively reused as fill material, in 2001. Cleanup of the mine waste began in 2007 and the Route 249 bypass opened to the public in October 2008. EPA has developed innovative solutions for disposal of site wastes to allow for future development. Some of these solutions include: constructing long narrow repositories which were capped and turned into three miles of new roads for Webb City, utilizing an abandoned water treatment lagoon as a repository that will soon become a new thirty-six acre sports complex in Webb City and designing and constructing other repositories for future development, including one that will become a forty-acre truck stop. In 2009, the site received approximately $12.7 million in American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) funds to support excavation and disposal of the site's contaminated mining wastes, soils and sediments. The funds also supported the capping of the disposal areas, the backfilling and revegetation of excavated areas and the construction of wetlands to improve surface water cleanup. Today, workers have cleaned up more than 1,600 acres of the site that are ready for redevelopment. Community members continue to use the site property for residential and agricultural purposes.
Updated 1/2013

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Shenandoah Stables

The 7-acre Shenandoah Stables Superfund site is located near Moscow Mills, Missouri. In 1971, a St. Louis waste oil hauler sprayed the horse arena with about 2,000 gallons of dioxin-contaminated oil for dust control. Afterward, several adults and children became ill, and numerous birds, rodents and over 40 horses died. In 1971, site operators excavated the top 6 to 8 inches of contaminated soil for use as fill material in a new highway. In 1972, site operators disposed of an additional 18 inches of excavated soil from the arena in a swampy area on site. EPA sampling in 1982 verified dioxin contamination of the arena soil. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983and started the site cleanup in 1990. Cleanup activities included the excavation and eventual off-site incineration of tons of dioxin-contaminated soils. Following the removal of site contaminants, the decontamination of site storage structures and fencing further protected public health and safety. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2001. The site remains in use as a horse stable and a private residence.
Updated 1/2013

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St. Louis Airport/Hazelwood Interim Storage/Futura Coatings Co.
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The St. Louis Airport/Hazelwood Interim Storage/Futura Coatings Co. Superfund site includes numerous properties in two areas: the St. Louis Downtown site and the North County sites. The St. Louis Downtown site is located at the Mallinckrodt Chemical Plant. The North County sites are located near the Lambert International Airport. The North County sites include the St. Louis Airport site, Hazelwood Interim Storage site and nearby properties. From 1942 to 1957, site operators processed uranium ores at the downtown site. Transfer of process residues from downtown to sites near the airport resulted in the contamination of many private and municipally owned properties. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities include soil excavation and disposal. Covidien currently owns and operates the former Mallinckrodt, Inc. facility, part of the North County sites. Nearby on-site properties support active businesses such as a lumberyard, metal salvage and steel fabrication businesses, railroad lines, bridge structures and a portion of the earthen levee and concrete floodwall that protects the St. Louis area from Mississippi River floodwaters.
Updated 10/2013

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Times Beach Site Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The 1-square-mile Times Beach Superfund site is located 20 miles southwest of St. Louis, Missouri. The site is a formerly incorporated city that sprayed its roads with waste oil in order to control dust in the early 1970s. During a 1982 investigation, EPA discovered that the city used dioxin-contaminated oil. During the same period, the nearby Meramec River flooded the city and residents had to evacuate their homes. Afterward, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended the permanent relocation of the evacuated residents. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA also transferred funds to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for the permanent relocation of residents and businesses in 1983. All residents successfully relocated by the end of 1986. Following completion of the permanent relocation, the State of Missouri took title to the site. In 1997, site cleanup activities concluded. In 1999, the restored site opened as a state park and EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2001. The park itself provides more than seven miles of trails for hiking, biking and equestrian use. Visitors can see a multitude of wildlife including turkey, geese, deer and more than 40 species of birds. Picnic sites abound and a boat ramp provides easy access to the Meramec River. In 2012, EPA completed a reassessment of the park to determine, in part, if any residual dioxin contamination remained above the recently revised non-cancer reference dose. The result of the reassessment concluded that current use of the Route 66 State Park does not pose significant health risks to public visitors or park workers.
Updated 1/2013

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Valley Park TCE

The Valley Park TCE Superfund site is located within the city limits of Valley Park, Missouri. The site boundaries are the extent of a plume of contaminated ground water in the Meramec River alluvial aquifer. Beginning in 1954, Valley Technologies operated two divisions in Valley Park, Missouri, Precision Forgings and Valley Heat Treat-until it began operating solely as Valley Technologies. Precision Forgings manufactured aluminum pressings, and Valley Heat Treat provided heat treatment services on metal parts. Valley Heat Treat utilized a degreaser that used various solvents through the years of operation. Steel drums stored degreaser wastes on a gravel lot until pickup for disposal. Several employees reported regular spillage of wastes from drums onto the gravel lot, burial of drums containing wastes, and cleaning solvents released directly onto the ground. The property owner, Wainright, also operated a metal stamping and tool and die shop on the site. Between 1963 and 1979, manufacturing processes included the use of a solvent degreasing system. Neighbors and a former employee reported that site operators disposed of liquid wastes from the solvent degreasing system on the ground behind the facility. In 1982, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources detected a number of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in all three municipal water supply wells serving the community. Private wells within the vicinity of the site are also contaminated with VOCs. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. That same year, Valley Park installed aeration equipment at its water treatment plant to remove the VOCs from drinking water. Valley Park connected to the St. Louis County public water system in 1989. This system now supplies the city’s drinking water. In 1988 and 1989, soil sampling results showed extremely high levels of numerous solvents on the site. A responsible party removed 331 cubic yards of contaminated soil and backfilled the area in 1990. EPA completed the excavation of 5,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil in 2006. In addition, EPA constructed the ground water extraction well and air stripper treatment system, an in-situ soil vapor extraction treatment system, and a ground water monitoring network. Thanks to the successful cleanup of the area, numerous commercial and industrial businesses continue to operate on the site. Residential land use remained constant throughout the cleanup. The presence of successful industry, restaurants and the Valley Park Police Station on the site illustrates how successful site cleanup can enrich the local community, as well as provide valuable employment and income to the area.
Updated 1/2013

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Weldon Spring Quarry/Plant/Pits (USDOE/ARMY) Alternative Energy Green Infrastructure

The Weldon Spring Quarry/Plant/Pits (USDOE/ARMY) Superfund site is located in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of two geographically distinct properties, the 220-acre Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and Raffinate Pit sites and the 9-acre Weldon Spring Quarry. During the 1940s, the Department of the Army constructed the 17,232-acre Weldon Spring Ordnance Works facility, used for manufacturing explosives. In 1956, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) constructed the Weldon Spring Uranium Feed Materials Plant (also known as the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant) on site. Facility operators converted processed uranium ore to other uranium compounds. In 1967, AEC closed the plant and the Army reacquired it. During construction of the Weldon Spring Ordnance Works, workers mined the Weldon Spring Quarry for limestone aggregate. Owners also used the quarry for burning wastes from explosives and disposing of waste. Activities at the site resulted in contamination of site buildings, ground water and soil. EPA added the Weldon Spring Quarry to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. EPA later expanded the NPL listing to include the Chemical Plant and Raffinate Pit sites in 1989. Together the three areas became known as the Weldon Spring Site. Cleanup activities included cleaning and dismantling buildings; treating ground water, storm water and surface water; constructing an on-site disposal cell; and removing and treating or disposing of soils. Current land use at the site includes the Weldon Spring Quarry and the U.S. Army Reserve Weldon Spring Training Area. Missouri Department of Conservation and Missouri Department of National Resources Division of State Parks managed lands are on site. Additionally, the Francis Howell High School, a Missouri Department of Transportation maintenance facility and the Public Water Supply District #2 water treatment facility are located at the site. Other current uses of the site include a law-enforcement training center, the Village of Weldon Spring Heights and a University of Missouri research park. The Weldon Spring Site Interpretive Center is part of The U.S. Department of Energy’s long-term surveillance and maintenance activities at the site. An estimated 5,000 to 15,000 individuals use site amenities, including the Hamburg Trail, the disposal cell perimeter road for prairie viewing, the disposal viewing platform and the Native Plant Education Garden. The kindergarten through grade 12 education community continues to have significant interest in Interpretive Center programs. Installed as part of a renewable-energy demonstration project for the public, a wind turbine supplements the power for the new renewable-energy display inside the Interpretive Center.
Updated 2/2014

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Wheeling Disposal Service Co., Inc., Landfilll Green Infrastructure
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The 20-acre Wheeling Disposal Service Co., Inc., Landfill Superfund site is located about 1 mile south of Amazonia, Missouri. Wheeling Disposal Service Company, Inc. operated a sanitary and industrial landfill on the site starting in the early 1970s. The landfill closed in 1986. Former waste disposal activities resulted in site-wide contamination. EPA field investigations detected contamination in monitoring wells, springs and soil on the site. In 1989, EPA added the site to its National Priorities List (NPL). EPA’s cleanup plan included upgrading the existing landfill cap with a clay and soil cover and monitoring ground water and surface water. During cleanup, the owner dug a pond. With assistance from the state, the owner planted native wild grasses and other foliage to attract birds and wildlife. Bordered on all sides by creeks and ravines, the site is now a habitat for wildlife and birds, often used for recreational hunting and fishing. The successful efforts of EPA, the state and the property owner resulted in the transformation of a former landfill into an important source of habitat for local flora and fauna. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in October of 2000.
Updated 1/2013

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