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Sites in Reuse in Oregon

Allied Plating, Inc.

The 12-acre Allied Plating, Inc. Superfund site is located in Portland, Oregon. On-site plating activities led to heavy metal contamination of ground water, surface water and soil. After EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990, EPA identified three areas for site investigation and cleanup. The southernmost section contained the administrative and storage building for the former Allied Plating business. This area was across the street from the location where plating activities occurred and did not require cleanup. The "layout area" contained the building housing the former plating operation and a storage yard. The "impoundment area" is the northern, low lying area of the property. This is the area where operators discharged plating wastewater. Contaminants of concern included metals and cyanide. In 1992, EPA excavated 1,100 cubic yards of contaminated soil and sludge from the site and treated and disposed of the material in an off-site landfill. EPA then backfilled the impoundment area with rock. In 1993, EPA determined that no further actions were required at the site. However, EPA required the property owner to place a restriction on the deed for the property preventing future ground water use. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1994. EPA continues to inspect the site every five years. Basic Fire Protection, a company making and installing fire prevention sprinkler systems, continues to occupy the “layout area” of the site. The "impoundment area" continues to be used for storage of heavy equipment and other large items.
Updated 12/2012

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Harbor Oil Inc.

The 4.2-acre Harbor Oil Inc. Superfund site is located in Portland, Oregon in an industrial area adjacent to Force Lake. The facility operators began cleaning tanker trucks and recycling oil in the 1950s to 1960s. In March 1974, there was a major spill or release of waste oil from on-site storage tanks. In October 1979, a severe fire destroyed the facility and ruptured five 20,000-gallon aboveground used oil tanks. The incident caused large volumes of used oils and smaller volumes of waste paints to flow across the site, into the wetlands that border the site and Force Lake. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2003. Site investigation results showed that the site contamination does not pose an unacceptable risk to human health or the environment. So the site requires no cleanup according to the 2013 Record of Decision. No additional work will be conducted at the site by EPA unless new information is discovered. American Petroleum Environmental Services is the current site operator, recycling used oil at the site.
Updated 10/2013

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Joseph Forest Products

The 18-acre Joseph Forest Products Superfund site is located about one mile northwest of the City of Joseph, Oregon. A wood-treating facility operated at the site from 1974 until 1985. Contamination resulted from poor management practices and a fire that destroyed the treatment building and caused a release of wood treatment solution. The company filed for bankruptcy in 1984 and ceased operations in 1985. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Contaminants of concern included copper, chrome, arsenic and lead. Cleanup actions included the excavation and off-site disposal of 6,443 tons of contaminated soil and debris, the implementation of institutional controls and monitoring of ground water for three years. EPA deleted the site from NPL in 1999. A resident living on an adjacent property uses the site as pasture for a few cows.
Updated 12/2012

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Northwest Pipe & Casing/Hall Process Company

The 53-acre Northwest Pipe & Casing/Hall Process Company Superfund site is located in an industrial park in Clackamas, Oregon. Operators conducted pipe manufacturing and coating operations at the site from 1956 to 1985. Improper waste disposal activities resulted in the contamination of surface water, soil and ground water. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. Site cleanup included demolition and removal of all site infrastructure, excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soils, and placement of a two-foot clean soil cap over contaminated areas of soil. EPA began operating 15 on-site ground water circulation wells to strip contaminants from ground water in 2004. EPA shut these wells down in 2006 and 2007 because of poor performance. In 2009, EPA excavated approximately 25,000 tons of contaminated soil and disposed of the material off site. EPA also treated over 500,000 gallons of contaminated ground water on site. Ground water monitoring continues. The site consists of two parcels: Parcel A, comprised of an 11-acre western lot and a 9-acre eastern lot, and the 30-acre Parcel B. The Oregon Department of Transportation owns the 11-acre western lot of Parcel A. The department operates a warehouse, office space, equipment yard, and greenhouse and plant nursery on the lot. A card-lock fueling station is also located in the western end of the equipment yard. The Northwest Development Corporation owns the 9-acre eastern lot of Parcel A. The Clackamas Commerce Park occupies the lot, which consists of three warehouse/office spaces and associated parking lots. Clackamas County Development Agency purchased Parcel B in 2005. In 2009, the development agency leased the parcel to Oregon Iron Works, which completed a laydown yard in the northeast corner of Parcel B in fall 2009. In summer 2010, Oregon Iron Works completed construction of a streetcar test track and maintenance facility on the southern half of Parcel B. In addition, the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) has been planning to construct a highway across the entire length of both parcels running from the northwest corner of Parcel A to the southeast corner of Parcel B. EPA has been coordinating with ODOT on the construction of the Sunrise Corridor. ODOT began construction of the Sunrise Corridor, which will reach completion in late 2016.
Updated 9/2014

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Portland Harbor
Site photo

The Portland Harbor Superfund site is located in Portland, Oregon. The site includes a 10-mile stretch of the Willamette River known as the Portland Harbor, as well as several riverfront properties. For over 150 years, the Willamette River has served as an international port for commerce. The surrounding properties have supported an industrial center with manufacturing, shipbuilding, petroleum, metal salvaging and power-generation activities. These industrial uses have resulted in the contamination of river sediment, soil and ground water at riverfront properties. In 2000, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). The Lower Willamette Group, a group of ten potentially responsible parties (PRPs), has been investigating the site and evaluating cleanup options. Individual PRPs have completed three removal actions and two cleanup actions. PRPs are planning a third potential cleanup action but they may not implement it until EPA issues its final cleanup decision in a Record of Decision. In 2002, the Portland Harbor National Resource Trustee Council formed. The group works to ensure that remedial efforts consider public natural resources such as water, fish, birds and wildlife as part of the site cleanup process. Close coordination between the council and EPA during site cleanup will help to incorporate habitat restoration into the cleanup activities. Through a Bona Fide Prospective Purchaser Doing Work Agreement with EPA, the University of Portland purchased the 35-acre Triangle Park area of the site in 2008. EPA and the University of Portland have begun work to clean up the area. This work ensures that activities remain consistent with long-term cleanup goals for the site as a whole. Following completion of cleanup, the university will begin restoration of the property. The university anticipates that the transformation of the contaminated industrial property will provide housing and athletic fields. In addition, a trail will provide public access to the Willamette River waterfront for members of the university community. Other areas of the site are currently ready for reuse. Local businesses are interested in these redevelopment opportunities. A company that leases a 7-acre portion of the site in Portland’s St. Johns neighborhood hopes to bring in businesses involved in bio-char production and wooden shipbuilding. Another business is considering the site as a location for a solar-powered aquaponics greenhouse.
Updated 6/2014

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Reynolds Metals Company
Site photo

The Reynolds Metals Company Superfund site is located approximately 20 miles east of Portland, and just over one mile north of the City of Troutland. A former aluminum smelter plant, the site included the location of the 80-acre plant and approximately 700 surrounding acres. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994 as a result of contaminated ground water, surface water, sediments and soils. Beginning in 1995, Reynolds Metal Company undertook a number of cleanup actions at the site. In 2000, Alcoa purchased the plant and announced its plans to permanently close the plant. Between 2003 and 2006, Alcoa demolished all plant buildings. Reynolds Metal Company completed most major Superfund cleanup actions by 2008. That same year, the Port of Portland bought the 700-acre site from Alcoa and developed it as the Troutdale Reynolds Industrial Park. The Port of Portland sold the first 78-acre parcel to FedEx Ground, which built a 447,000-square-foot regional distribution center. The $130 million dollar center opened in October 2010 and plans to reach a workforce of approximately 1000 employees in the coming years. The Port of Portland plans to develop an additional 280 acres of the site property for industrial uses. The Port will set aside the rest of the land for infrastructure, open space, wetlands and a recreational trail. In 2010, the Port received a national Phoenix Award in 2010 for achievement of excellence in Superfund site reuse.
Updated 8/2013

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Taylor Lumber and Treating

The Taylor Lumber and Treating Superfund site is located in Sheridan, Oregon. Taylor Lumber and Treating conducted wood-treating operations from 1966 to 2001 in an area generally referred to as the West Facility. The facility pressure treated logs for use as utility poles and pilings. Drips, spills and leaks of wood-treating chemicals from storage tanks, drip pads, tank farms and log storage areas resulted in ground water contamination and in soil contamination at the site and in nearby roadside ditches. The facility ceased operations when Taylor Lumber and Treating filed for bankruptcy in 2001. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) that same year. Between 2000 and 2005, EPA completed several short-term cleanup actions at the site. In 2007 and 2008, EPA completed the majority of site cleanup actions, which included excavating contaminated soils from nearly five acres of the site and disposing of them off-site at a hazardous waste landfill. In 2011, EPA implemented institutional controls to restrict ground water use and non-industrial land use at the site and began annual groundwater monitoring and sampling. The State of Oregon is conducting long-term ground water monitoring. In 2002, Pacific Wood Preserving of Oregon (PWPO) entered into a Prospective Purchaser Agreement with EPA. PWPO purchased the wood-treating West Facility (approximately 40 acres) and began wood-treating operations in June 2002. In 2011, EPA revised and updated the agreement. Currently, the PWPO facility manufactures wood products that include transmission poles, telephone and utility poles, distribution poles, dimensional lumber, laminated beams and fence posts.
Updated 12/2012

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Teledyne Wah Chang

The Oremet-Wah Chang (OWC) plant (formerly Teledyne Wah Chang) plant is located in Millersburg, Oregon. The facility is one of the country's largest producers of rare earth metals and alloys. The Teledyne Wah Chang Superfund site includes the 110-acre plant, a 115-acre area made up of four ponds containing sludges from the plant's wastewater treatment facility, and a 60-acre field where operators used sludges containing radium as a soil amendment. Production at the site began in 1957. Past disposal practices resulted in the contamination of soil, sediments and ground water. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. OWC completed cleanup actions to address contaminated sediments in 1998 and contaminated soil in 1999. OWC began operating the ground water treatment system in 2000. The ground water treatment system continues to operate. OWC enhanced the system in 2009 after adding microbial remediation technologies once EPA approved additional steps to address contaminated ground water in areas not affected by the existing ground water treatment system. The OWC plant continues to operate, employing several hundred workers.
Updated 12/2012

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Union Pacific Railroad Co. Tie-Treating Plant

The 83-acre Union Pacific Railroad Co. Tie Treating Plant Superfund site is located in a mixed commercial and residential area in The Dalles, Oregon. Union Pacific owned the wood treatment facility from 1926 until late 1987. The facility treated railroad ties for Union Pacific and other commercial users. In 1987, the Kerr-McGee Chemical Corporation purchased the facility equipment and structures. But Union Pacific retained ownership of the land and responsibility for all pre-1987 contamination of soil and ground water. The main sources of contamination were wastewater ponds and spills of treatment solutions. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup activities included waste removal; ground water containment, extraction, treatment and discharge; and surface discharge controls. The site consists of an active wood-treating area operated by Amerities West, LLC, the undeveloped portion of Riverfront Park, and a small area of Columbia River sediments next to the undeveloped portion of Riverfront Park.
Updated 10/2013

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United Chrome Products, Inc.
Site photo

The United Chrome Products, Inc. Superfund site is located in the Airport and Industrial Research Park (airport complex), about 3.5 miles south of Corvallis, Oregon. The 1.5-acre site is a former industrial hard-chrome plating facility. The City of Corvallis owns the site, which is surrounded by agricultural (non-food grass seed), aviation and light industrial uses. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984 following the identification of contamination in ground water and soil. In 1985, EPA removed 8,000 gallons of chrome-contaminated liquids and 11,000 pounds of hazardous waste off-site for disposal. Long-term cleanup actions began in 1988. Some contamination remains in ground water in an isolated area of the site. The city continues to pump contaminated ground water in this area and perform long-term ground water monitoring. The city currently leases most of the United Chrome property to Helicopter Transport Services for use as an equipment staging area. CoEnergy leases the northeast corner of the site for truck parking and propane distribution. The city has planned an above-ground fuel farm for this portion of the airport property.
Updated 12/2012

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